Images by Alan

24 May 2018 26 views
 
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photoblog image Ruthven Barracks

Ruthven Barracks

This is from last week in the Cairngorms National Park. 

 

Ruthven Barracks, near Ruthven in Badenoch, Scotland, are the best preserved of the four barracks built in 1719 after the 1715 Jacobite rising. Set on an old castle mound, the complex comprises two large three-storey blocks occupying two sides of the enclosure, each with two rooms per floor. The barracks and enclosing walls were built with loopholes for musket firing, and bastion towers were built at opposite corners. Destroyed by Jacobites following their retreat after the Battle of Culloden in 1746, the Barracks ruins are maintained as a Scheduled Monument by Historic Scotland.


Due to continued unrest, the British government decided to build fortified barracks in strategic locations: the new barracks at Ruthven were completed in 1721 on the castle hilltop. The barracks accommodated 120 troops and 28 horses for dragoons. In August 1745 a unit of 12 British soldiers, commanded by a Sergeant Terrence Molloy of the 6th Regiment of Foot, defended the barracks against 200 Jacobites losing just one man, whilst killing at least two Jacobites and wounding many more. The following year Lieutenant Terrence Molloy surrendered to a larger force of Jacobites with two cannons commanded by John Gordon of Glenbuche[1], after a short siege where the British repelled a Jacobite attack, killing many of the Jacobites.


On the day after the Battle of Culloden in 1746, some 3,000 Jacobites retreated to Fort Ruthven but they were sent home by Prince Charles Edward Stuart as their situation was hopeless. The departing Jacobites destroyed the barracks on 17 April 1746. The remnants remain.

 

Alas not one of my better images but I had a significant mishap with my camera on the first day in the Cairngorms when it fell off my friend's tripod; I'd not secured it properly. The glass "Big Stopper" filter on the front of the camera cracked in half and the rear screen cracked; it was imposible to see any image that I had taken and it made it almost impossible to read the menus. Luckliy, images taken in better lighting seem fine from the quick scan I've since had of them on the computer. I took the camera to a specialist repair centre in London on Tuesday and I'm expecting a bill of around £400. 

 

(I've since found a better image of this which I will post in the coming weeks),

 

Ruthven Barracks

This is from last week in the Cairngorms National Park. 

 

Ruthven Barracks, near Ruthven in Badenoch, Scotland, are the best preserved of the four barracks built in 1719 after the 1715 Jacobite rising. Set on an old castle mound, the complex comprises two large three-storey blocks occupying two sides of the enclosure, each with two rooms per floor. The barracks and enclosing walls were built with loopholes for musket firing, and bastion towers were built at opposite corners. Destroyed by Jacobites following their retreat after the Battle of Culloden in 1746, the Barracks ruins are maintained as a Scheduled Monument by Historic Scotland.


Due to continued unrest, the British government decided to build fortified barracks in strategic locations: the new barracks at Ruthven were completed in 1721 on the castle hilltop. The barracks accommodated 120 troops and 28 horses for dragoons. In August 1745 a unit of 12 British soldiers, commanded by a Sergeant Terrence Molloy of the 6th Regiment of Foot, defended the barracks against 200 Jacobites losing just one man, whilst killing at least two Jacobites and wounding many more. The following year Lieutenant Terrence Molloy surrendered to a larger force of Jacobites with two cannons commanded by John Gordon of Glenbuche[1], after a short siege where the British repelled a Jacobite attack, killing many of the Jacobites.


On the day after the Battle of Culloden in 1746, some 3,000 Jacobites retreated to Fort Ruthven but they were sent home by Prince Charles Edward Stuart as their situation was hopeless. The departing Jacobites destroyed the barracks on 17 April 1746. The remnants remain.

 

Alas not one of my better images but I had a significant mishap with my camera on the first day in the Cairngorms when it fell off my friend's tripod; I'd not secured it properly. The glass "Big Stopper" filter on the front of the camera cracked in half and the rear screen cracked; it was imposible to see any image that I had taken and it made it almost impossible to read the menus. Luckliy, images taken in better lighting seem fine from the quick scan I've since had of them on the computer. I took the camera to a specialist repair centre in London on Tuesday and I'm expecting a bill of around £400. 

 

(I've since found a better image of this which I will post in the coming weeks),

 

comments (8)

Sorry to hear about your camera repair. Great picture though...
Alan: Thanks, Larry. I'm hoping to claim on my insurance.
This is a super shot, Alan, no matter your problems. I'm sorry to hear about your camera, no insurance?
Alan: Thanks, Frank. I'm hoping to claim on my all risks section on my home insurance.
  • Ray
  • Not Germany...
  • 24 May 2018, 06:07
Ooooops!

Bloddy tripods!
Alan: No fault of the tripod, only my lack of attention to the very slightly different locking mechanism on my friend's tripod than on my own.
  • gutteridge
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 24 May 2018, 07:21
This is yet another splendid photograph by you Alan. You really should make a book of them.
Alan: I will be doing a book at some point; would you like to pre-order a copy?
  • Martine
  • France
  • 24 May 2018, 07:23
Magnifique éclairage.
Alan: We saw this earlier int he week during the daylight and having seen that there were floodlights we decided to return one evening.
  • Chris
  • Not Nowhere
  • 24 May 2018, 07:48
It looks to be quite an eerie place. Bad luck regarding the camera
Alan: Can you imagine hordes of men wearing skirts making a racket with their bagpipes, though? That would deter any invaders - unless they were also wearing skirts and making another racket with their bagpipes?
That is an expensive mishap Alan. This is still a pleasing shot though
Alan: The fall result of my lack of attention to the very slightly different locking mechanism on my friend's tripod than on my own. Frustratingly, it only fell around 18inches but just caught the edges of a very knobbly tree root; I saved it from falling into the loch, though.
Quite a historic building isn't it. Sorry to read about your camera, I hope they get it sorted for that sort of money.

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for this photo I'm in a positive comments icon ShMood©
camera Canon EOS 5D Mark III
exposure mode aperture priority
shutterspeed 1/13s
aperture f/4.0
sensitivity ISO3200
focal length 105.0mm
A wee Highland cooA wee Highland c...

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