Images by Alan

21 Apr 2017 40 views
 
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photoblog image Boat Friday

Boat Friday

This was early-ish last Friday morning at the mouth of Christchurch Harbour. 

 

Christchurch Harbour is a natural harbour in the county of Dorset, on the south coast of England named after the nearby town of Christchurch. Two Rivers the Avon and the Stour flow into the Harbour at its northwest corner. The harbour is generally shallow and due to the tidal harmonics in the English Channel has a double high water on each tide. On the north side of the harbour, east of the River Avon are Priory Marsh, and to the east of this Stanpit Marsh, a Local Nature Reserve. To the west side of the harbour are Wick Fields, the southern flank of the harbour being bounded by Hengistbury Head, a prominent coastal headland. The harbour flows into the Christchurch Bay and the English Channel through a narrow channel known locally as The Run, seen here to the right, which rests between Mudeford Quay and Mudeford Spit. Shallow draught boats can enter from this channel and cruise up stream for 2 miles choosing either the River Avon or the River Stour, the Stour leading up as far as Iford Bridge passing Christchurch Quay and Tuckton.


Christchurch Harbour Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) is a 352 hectare site designated both for its biological and geological interest. It comprises the estuary of the Stour and Avon and the Hengistbury Head peninsula. The varied habitats include saltmarsh, wet meadows, grassland, heath, sand dune, woodland and scrub. The site is of great ornithological interest with some 320 bird species having been recorded by Christchurch Harbour Ornithological Group.


The harbour was formed around 7000 years ago when the sea level rose at the end of the last Ice Age. Previously the area which was many miles from the open sea was inhabited by Stone Age hunters. Archaeological finds dating from 12,500 year BP have been made on Hengistbury Head and Flints dating as much as 250,000 years BP have been found in the Bournemouth area.[3] The Bluestones used at Stonehenge may have been transported via the harbour and the River Avon (2550 BCE).[4] It is suggested that there may have been an ancient causeway usable at low water running from Double Dykes on the south shore to Tuttons Well located on the north shore near Stanpit village.


The Harbour became a major trading port around 100BCE, exports included copper, gold, silver and iron and importing luxury goods including wine and glass from which jewellery was manufactured. It is likely that slaves were also exported through the harbour. The boats used at this time were shallow draft, oak-planked with square leather sails for propulsion. It would have been a twelve-hour passage across the channel to Cherbourg and without any modern compasses or much weather forecasting. Despite this there was considerable two way trade with both British and Foreign Ports, it then declined as a result of the Roman invasion of France in 56 BCE.[7] The remains of a Roman ship were discovered in the harbour in 1910.[8] Trade continued until the Roman Invasion of Britain in AD43. During Saxon times the harbour again became one of the most important in Britain[9] as it was easily reached from the continent and boats could enter the harbour and travel up the river Avon all the way to Salisbury, and along the Stour to Wimborne and Blandford Forum.


In 1664 The River Avon Navigation act was passed to again enable vessels to travel as far as Salisbury and reestablish it as a port as in Medieval times.Traffic used the river from 1684 to 1720 with a break whilst repairs were made from 1695 to 1700. The route was finally abandoned in 1730.[10] In 1695 Lord Clarendon made a new entrance in Mudeford Sandbank using the iron stone from Hengistbury to form a training bank, these rocks now called Clarendon Rocks are still in existence, but the new entrance silted up and the channel returned to its original course. During this period and up until the middle of the 19th Century, smuggling was rife in the Harbour (see the Battle of Mudeford).

Boat Friday

This was early-ish last Friday morning at the mouth of Christchurch Harbour. 

 

Christchurch Harbour is a natural harbour in the county of Dorset, on the south coast of England named after the nearby town of Christchurch. Two Rivers the Avon and the Stour flow into the Harbour at its northwest corner. The harbour is generally shallow and due to the tidal harmonics in the English Channel has a double high water on each tide. On the north side of the harbour, east of the River Avon are Priory Marsh, and to the east of this Stanpit Marsh, a Local Nature Reserve. To the west side of the harbour are Wick Fields, the southern flank of the harbour being bounded by Hengistbury Head, a prominent coastal headland. The harbour flows into the Christchurch Bay and the English Channel through a narrow channel known locally as The Run, seen here to the right, which rests between Mudeford Quay and Mudeford Spit. Shallow draught boats can enter from this channel and cruise up stream for 2 miles choosing either the River Avon or the River Stour, the Stour leading up as far as Iford Bridge passing Christchurch Quay and Tuckton.


Christchurch Harbour Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) is a 352 hectare site designated both for its biological and geological interest. It comprises the estuary of the Stour and Avon and the Hengistbury Head peninsula. The varied habitats include saltmarsh, wet meadows, grassland, heath, sand dune, woodland and scrub. The site is of great ornithological interest with some 320 bird species having been recorded by Christchurch Harbour Ornithological Group.


The harbour was formed around 7000 years ago when the sea level rose at the end of the last Ice Age. Previously the area which was many miles from the open sea was inhabited by Stone Age hunters. Archaeological finds dating from 12,500 year BP have been made on Hengistbury Head and Flints dating as much as 250,000 years BP have been found in the Bournemouth area.[3] The Bluestones used at Stonehenge may have been transported via the harbour and the River Avon (2550 BCE).[4] It is suggested that there may have been an ancient causeway usable at low water running from Double Dykes on the south shore to Tuttons Well located on the north shore near Stanpit village.


The Harbour became a major trading port around 100BCE, exports included copper, gold, silver and iron and importing luxury goods including wine and glass from which jewellery was manufactured. It is likely that slaves were also exported through the harbour. The boats used at this time were shallow draft, oak-planked with square leather sails for propulsion. It would have been a twelve-hour passage across the channel to Cherbourg and without any modern compasses or much weather forecasting. Despite this there was considerable two way trade with both British and Foreign Ports, it then declined as a result of the Roman invasion of France in 56 BCE.[7] The remains of a Roman ship were discovered in the harbour in 1910.[8] Trade continued until the Roman Invasion of Britain in AD43. During Saxon times the harbour again became one of the most important in Britain[9] as it was easily reached from the continent and boats could enter the harbour and travel up the river Avon all the way to Salisbury, and along the Stour to Wimborne and Blandford Forum.


In 1664 The River Avon Navigation act was passed to again enable vessels to travel as far as Salisbury and reestablish it as a port as in Medieval times.Traffic used the river from 1684 to 1720 with a break whilst repairs were made from 1695 to 1700. The route was finally abandoned in 1730.[10] In 1695 Lord Clarendon made a new entrance in Mudeford Sandbank using the iron stone from Hengistbury to form a training bank, these rocks now called Clarendon Rocks are still in existence, but the new entrance silted up and the channel returned to its original course. During this period and up until the middle of the 19th Century, smuggling was rife in the Harbour (see the Battle of Mudeford).

comments (13)

  • Martine
  • France
  • 21 Apr 2017, 01:58
Ils seront bientôt dans l'eau.
Alan: yes, very true. Some of the more expensive homes in the UK will be under in the next 50 years if the the experts are to be believed.
  • Ray
  • United States
  • 21 Apr 2017, 02:21
Does it have a decent fish'n'chippery, Alan?
Alan: Oh yes - but first you have to take the ferry across the Race to the get to it.
Wow - seems so humble - but holds so many spectacular secrets. I think I would like this place
Alan: It was a favourite trip for my parents when were kids. We have slept in one of each huts that we had hired. Thanks, Elizabeth.
I would definitely like this place, Alan.
Alan: It was also a favourite with my parents when we were kids, There is no public road access so it was always a sense of adventure getting the.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 21 Apr 2017, 06:28
A gorgeous image. I have found myself DROOLING over the ILCE - 6300
Alan: It is a lovely place but very popular in the school holidays. I'm b=very pleased with the A6300; it is around half the weight of my Canon 5D so is far more luggable.
Merci pour les explications sur ce lieu mythique
J'aime beaucoup ta prise de vue
Alan: Thank you! I'm pleased you like the image.
Brexit will put paid to any trading with these foreign johnnies
This place is crying out for some decent development Alan.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 21 Apr 2017, 09:26
I understand that this is a place of happy memories for you. I like the early-ish feeling of solitude.
Built very close to the shore, eh. I heard yesterday that the yellow lichen grows only in clean air.
I knew where this is from the thumbnail, although I've only ever beent here on the other side of the water.
i like this point of view from behind the buildings Alan... the commercial building has a rusty old steel roof ... great colour and texture....petersmile
I wonder what rising sea levels will do for them?

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for this photo I'm in a positive comments icon ShMood©
camera ILCE-6300
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