Images by Alan

12 Jun 2017 43 views
 
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photoblog image Lyme Park

Lyme Park

Lyme Park is a large estate located south of Disley, Cheshire. The estate is managed by the National Trust and consists of a mansion house surrounded by formal gardens, in a deer park in the Peak District National Park. The house is the largest in Cheshire, and is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade I listed building.

 

The estate was granted to Sir Thomas Danyers in 1346 and passed to the Leghs of Lyme by marriage in 1388. It remained in the possession of the Legh family until 1946 when it was given to the National Trust. The house dates from the latter part of the 16th century. Modifications were made to it in the 1720s by Giacomo Leoni, who retained some of the Elizabethan features and added others, particularly the courtyard and the south range. It is difficult to classify Leoni's work at Lyme, as it contains elements of both Palladian and Baroque styles. Further modifications were made by Lewis Wyatt in the 19th century, especially to the interior.

 

Formal gardens were created and developed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The house, gardens and park have been used as locations for filming and they are open to the public. The Lyme Caxton Missal is on display in the Library.

Lyme Park

Lyme Park is a large estate located south of Disley, Cheshire. The estate is managed by the National Trust and consists of a mansion house surrounded by formal gardens, in a deer park in the Peak District National Park. The house is the largest in Cheshire, and is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade I listed building.

 

The estate was granted to Sir Thomas Danyers in 1346 and passed to the Leghs of Lyme by marriage in 1388. It remained in the possession of the Legh family until 1946 when it was given to the National Trust. The house dates from the latter part of the 16th century. Modifications were made to it in the 1720s by Giacomo Leoni, who retained some of the Elizabethan features and added others, particularly the courtyard and the south range. It is difficult to classify Leoni's work at Lyme, as it contains elements of both Palladian and Baroque styles. Further modifications were made by Lewis Wyatt in the 19th century, especially to the interior.

 

Formal gardens were created and developed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The house, gardens and park have been used as locations for filming and they are open to the public. The Lyme Caxton Missal is on display in the Library.

comments (13)

  • Ray
  • Not in United States
  • 12 Jun 2017, 00:44
Impeccable symmetry displayed beautifully with this fine image, Alan.
Alan: It took a bit of tweaking in Photoshop to get the angles all sorted. I chose B&W because the area was in deep shade.
This is perfect in B&W - slightly haunting!
Alan: Thanks, Elizabeth. I chose B&W because the area was in deep shade.
Definitely symmetrical, Alan, and definitely haunting. Excellent in B&W.
Alan: Thanks, Ginnie. It took a bit of tweaking in Photoshop to get the angles all sorted. I chose B&W because the area was in deep shade.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 12 Jun 2017, 06:46
This place looks fine and grand

But I've never heard of it before today
Alan: It was a speculative visit. I had seen the signs to it and thought I would pop in. Besides, I needed the loo...
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 12 Jun 2017, 07:06
Now that is an entrance..what wonderful stairs. Love the symmetry in this picture.
Alan: Quite a common feature for our grand country houses. From a time when money seemed to be no object. Thanks, Astrid.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 12 Jun 2017, 07:29
An impressive building built in a classical style. Your image emphasises the symmetry of this entrance.
Alan: Thanks, Philine. It took a bit of tweaking in Photoshop to get the angles all sorted. I chose B&W because the area was in deep shade.I can just imagine the footman greeting the guests and with the horse carriage waiting at the steps.
Funny how the National Trust is regarded as one of our treasured institutions. Like the NHS, but does not attract quite the same level of hysteria.
Alan: Yes, one that we quite happy to pay to visit yet the other we expect a "free" visit. I look forward to visiting one but not the other!
If I remember correctly it was used for the outside scenes in the BBC version of Pride and Prejudice.
Alan: Yes, I understand that it a good venue for historic settings of TV and film shows.
Nice symmetry, Alan.
Alan: Thanks, Frank. It took a bit of tweaking in Photoshop to get the angles all sorted. I chose B&W because the area was in deep shade.
A fine shot Alan. We are about to watch a recording of the recent Alan Titchmarsh visit to Lyme Park.
Alan: I happened across it by chance; I was driving from the Peak District to Liverpool and I kept seeing the signs. Plus I needed the loo...
Holy symmetry!
Alan: Thanks, Mark. It took a bit of tweaking in Photoshop to get the angles all sorted. I chose B&W because the area was in deep shade.
  • CherryPie
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 12 Jun 2017, 19:06
I have never actually been to this house.
Alan: I happened across it by chance; I was driving from the Peak District to Liverpool and I kept seeing the signs. Plus I needed the loo...
Somehow your diagonals are very crisp...

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focal length 16.0mm
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