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05 Nov 2018 29 views
 
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photoblog image Bonfire Night

Bonfire Night

Guy Fawkes Night, also known as Bonfire Night, is an annual commemoration observed on 5 November, primarily in the United Kingdom. Its history begins with the events of 5 November 1605, when Guy Fawkes, a member of the Gunpowder Plot, was arrested while guarding explosives the plotters had placed beneath the House of Lords. Celebrating the fact that King James I had survived the attempt on his life, people lit bonfires around London; and months later, the introduction of the Observance of 5th November Act enforced an annual public day of thanksgiving for the plot's failure.


Within a few decades Gunpowder Treason Day, as it was known, became the predominant English state commemoration, but as it carried strong Protestant religious overtones it also became a focus for anti-Catholic sentiment. Puritans delivered sermons regarding the perceived dangers of popery, while during increasingly raucous celebrations common folk burnt effigies of popular hate-figures, such as the pope. Towards the end of the 18th century reports appear of children begging for money with effigies of Guy Fawkes and 5 November gradually became known as Guy Fawkes Day. Towns such as Lewes and Guildford were in the 19th century scenes of increasingly violent class-based confrontations, fostering traditions those towns celebrate still, albeit peaceably. In the 1850s changing attitudes resulted in the toning down of much of the day's anti-Catholic rhetoric, and the Observance of 5th November Act was repealed in 1859. Eventually the violence was dealt with, and by the 20th century Guy Fawkes Day had become an enjoyable social commemoration, although lacking much of its original focus. The present-day Guy Fawkes Night is usually celebrated at large organised events, centred on a bonfire and extravagant firework displays.


Settlers exported Guy Fawkes Night to overseas colonies, including some in North America, where it was known as Pope Day. Those festivities died out with the onset of the American Revolution. Claims that Guy Fawkes Night was a Protestant replacement for older customs like Samhain are disputed, although another old celebration, Halloween, has lately increased in popularity, and according to some writers, may threaten the continued observance of 5 November.


Some say that Gut Fawkes was the only person to enter the Place of Westminster with any honest intent; I can;t possibly comment on that, though.

Bonfire Night

Guy Fawkes Night, also known as Bonfire Night, is an annual commemoration observed on 5 November, primarily in the United Kingdom. Its history begins with the events of 5 November 1605, when Guy Fawkes, a member of the Gunpowder Plot, was arrested while guarding explosives the plotters had placed beneath the House of Lords. Celebrating the fact that King James I had survived the attempt on his life, people lit bonfires around London; and months later, the introduction of the Observance of 5th November Act enforced an annual public day of thanksgiving for the plot's failure.


Within a few decades Gunpowder Treason Day, as it was known, became the predominant English state commemoration, but as it carried strong Protestant religious overtones it also became a focus for anti-Catholic sentiment. Puritans delivered sermons regarding the perceived dangers of popery, while during increasingly raucous celebrations common folk burnt effigies of popular hate-figures, such as the pope. Towards the end of the 18th century reports appear of children begging for money with effigies of Guy Fawkes and 5 November gradually became known as Guy Fawkes Day. Towns such as Lewes and Guildford were in the 19th century scenes of increasingly violent class-based confrontations, fostering traditions those towns celebrate still, albeit peaceably. In the 1850s changing attitudes resulted in the toning down of much of the day's anti-Catholic rhetoric, and the Observance of 5th November Act was repealed in 1859. Eventually the violence was dealt with, and by the 20th century Guy Fawkes Day had become an enjoyable social commemoration, although lacking much of its original focus. The present-day Guy Fawkes Night is usually celebrated at large organised events, centred on a bonfire and extravagant firework displays.


Settlers exported Guy Fawkes Night to overseas colonies, including some in North America, where it was known as Pope Day. Those festivities died out with the onset of the American Revolution. Claims that Guy Fawkes Night was a Protestant replacement for older customs like Samhain are disputed, although another old celebration, Halloween, has lately increased in popularity, and according to some writers, may threaten the continued observance of 5 November.


Some say that Gut Fawkes was the only person to enter the Place of Westminster with any honest intent; I can;t possibly comment on that, though.

comments (12)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 5 Nov 2018, 00:12
Wonderful stuff, Alan.
Alan: Thank yo; I was pleased with it.
This is an amazing photo! Did you use a tripod for that 6 second exposure?
Alan: Thanks, Elizabeth. Yes; it would just have been a messy blur if I had tried handholding.
C'est magnifique !
Alan: Thank you.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 5 Nov 2018, 06:51
a grand Bonfire Night and a magnificent photo!
Alan: I like to see fireworks but I don't like the effect of the noise have on animals. My cats were terrified of them. I wonder, too, about how the sheep and cows cope with them in the countryside. I believe a town in Italy has a festival with silent fireworks. Fireworks used to be used just one or two nights a year; now it is far more common. Thanks, Philine.
  • gutteridge
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 5 Nov 2018, 07:07
It looks like a bunch of flowers Alan, well captured.
Alan: I was impressed with that one especially.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 5 Nov 2018, 07:36
Nice pic

I hate all the banging we are bound to endure this evening. But it's tradition and saved the UK from a Catholic fate
Alan: Come back the good old days when fireworks used o be let off just one or two nights a year; now they are so frequent. I believe a town in Italy has a festival with silent fireworks; that should be better.
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 5 Nov 2018, 08:48
Wowee! I saw the site where they mine the red that goes into fireworks at the weekend - the other side of the Avon Gorge, which you know well
Alan: From the good days when they made fireworks in the UK; I think they now all come from the Far East.
Great shot Alan, was this somewhere in Southampton?
Alan: Yes, off our Town Quay. I was across the other side of Southampton Water in Marchwood to take this.
Spectacular phireworks foto.
beautifully done, Alan. looks almost like a flower.
Super shot Alan.
  • CherryPie
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 7 Nov 2018, 11:33
A stunning photograph.

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camera Canon EOS 40D
exposure mode full manual
shutterspeed 6s
aperture f/8.0
sensitivity ISO100
focal length 70.0mm
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